Google’s self-driving car

Posted on 04 June 2014 by Tony Santos

Google Driverless Car

Too lazy to drive to the store, but need to stock up on snacks? Now you can Google it!

As reported by motoring.com.au last week, Google have taken a giant leap in their bid to manufacture and market self-driving cars. Powered by electric motors and limited to a glacial 25mph (40km/h), the future certainly leaps closer.

The next generation of self-driving prototypes will navigate using GPS technology, and will be guided via sensors and cameras. With a vision of the road ahead reaching as far as 220 metres, the new Google cars should be able to detect any problems before they arise.

Just as well as passengers will have no physical control of the vehicle, with no pedals, gearboxes or steering wheels to navigate manually. Instead, passengers will simply select where they would like to go and push a button to begin.

The current prototype is a giant leap ahead from the previous trials using already existing vehicles, like the Toyota Prius and Lexus RX. Although Google’s own rendition appears rather less comfortable and practical at these early stages.

For example; only two passengers may use the vehicle at one time. Whilst inside the vehicle, Google’s CEO Sergey Brin claims the car is minimalist, with a priority for learning over luxury. In other words, don’t expect creature comforts, such as Bluetooth, iPod integration, heated seats and climate control. It does however have a roll cage, which is somewhat reassuring.

No worries though, as this exact vehicle will most likely never reach a showroom, due to legislative difficulties and obvious perfecting of the technology. Once it arrives though, this could spell disaster for delivery and taxi drivers, as the need for human control is no longer required.

One hundred prototypes have already been manufactured by a mysterious manufacturer based in Detroit, Michigan, and will partake in a US-based trial period in the coming years.

Categorized | Car News, Concept Cars

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